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The Spanish Language History

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Introduction

The Spanish language is a Romance language that has its origins in Spain’s Castille region. As a result, it’s also known as Castilian (especially in Latin America). In 2019, as per Thought Co. Spanish ranked second in the world in terms of the number of individuals who speak it as their first language. Spanish is spoken in over and about twenty one countries.  

History 

The Spanish language has its origins in Latin, which was introduced to the Iberian peninsula following the Roman conquest in the third and second centuries BC. King Alfonso made that dialect (Castilian) the official language of government administration in the 13th century. The Spanish Empire was one of the world’s most powerful empires. Spanish colonisation brought the language to Mexico, Central, Western, and Southern South America in the 16th century, where it is still spoken today. In the late 15th century, Castilian became the official language of all of Spain after the kingdoms of Castile and Leon combined with that of Aragon. Aragon, Navarra, Leon, Asturias, and Santander dialects were gradually pushed out and now only exist in isolated rural areas. Masius Sala, in her explicit article, mentions the dialect of Spanish spoken in Arab controlled Spain was named Mozarabic. It is most known for Mozarabic refrains (known as kharjahs) added to Arabic and Hebrew poetry.

The regional distinctions in Spanish are roughly comparable to the variances between American and British English. English and Spanish languages borrow words from Latin and Arabic, they share a lot of lexica. The usage of gender in Spanish, as well as more complex verb conjugation and frequent use of the subjunctive mood, are the most significant grammar distinctions between the two languages. 

Conclusion 

In comparison to other languages, mastering the differences in Spanish dialects around the world is not difficult. Spanish speakers from various countries can nevertheless interact well without knowing the native vernacular dialect of the foreign country.

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